My Publications

Is low-carb safe? What are the facts, and what is the nutritional key to longevity.
Oxygen Magazine - Jan 2016
The long and short term effects of following a low carb diet. Addressing the myths surrounding low carb dieting and why it might appear to work in the short term. Suggestions made for the best type of diet to follow long term.

Do you BOSU?
M2 Woman Magazine - Dec 2015
A fully illustrated (with demonstrative pictures) workout involving powerbags with safety considerations and exercise descriptions.

Mind the Junk
Oxygen Magazine - Nov 2015
Part 3 of a 3 part series addressing why junk food is so addictive.

Sleep and tiredness the silent saboteurs
Iron Man Australia - Nov 2015
How sleep and tiredness effect the gains that can be made in exercise and weight loss. Based on new research, and how there is more to sleep than just averaging 6-8 hours a night.

HIIT it!
M2 Woman Magazine - Oct 2015
A description and history of "High Intensity Interval Training" (HIIT), its uses, and a fully illustrated written exercise program to follow at home.

Mind the Junk
Oxygen Magazine - Sep 2015
Part 2 of a 3 part series addressing why junk food is so addictive.

Plateaus
Iron Man Magazine Australia - Sep 2015
A description of what a plateau is, what it means, why it happens and how to change things to overcome the plateau.

Walking is a feasible physical activity for people with rheumatoid arthritis: a feasibility randomised controlled trial
Musculoskeletal Care - Aug 2015

Background. Exercise has been recognized as important in the management of RA. Walking is a low-cost and low-impact activity, requires no specialist training, is suited to a variety of environments and is inherently a clinically meaningful measure of independence.
Methods. Thirty-three people with RA were recruited from Dunedin Hospital rheumatology outpatient clinics and enrolled in a walking randomized controlled trial (RCT) feasibility study. Participants were randomly allocated to the walking intervention (n=11) or control (n=22) groups. Control participants received a nutrition education session, and the walking intervention group received instructions on a walking route with three loops, to be com- pleted 3–4 times per week. The walking route shape was designed so that the length of the walk could be tailored by participants. Both groups were assessed at baseline and six weeks later. The primary outcome measures were feasibility, acceptability and safety. The principal secondary outcome was change in walking speed after the intervention. Additional outcome measures were a step-up test, activity limitations (on the Health Assessment Questionnaire), global well-being (on the European Quality of Life Questionnaire), self-efficacy for managing arthritis symptoms, self-efficacy for physical activity, daily pedometer readings and a daily visual analogue scale for pain.
Results. Participants successfully completed the walk for the suggested frequency, indicating feasibility and acceptability. There were no reported adverse effects of participation and the walking intervention group did not have higher daily pain levels than the control group, indicating safety. The walking intervention group showed a pattern of improvements in self-efficacy and global well-being; no changes in these outcomes were noted in the control group.
Conclusions. Walking appears to be a feasible, acceptable and safe intervention for people with RA.

Mind the Junk
Oxygen Magazine - Jul 2015
Part 1 of a 3 part series to explore (scientifically) why junk food is so tempting, and addictive.

What are the perceived barriers, facilitators and attitudes to exercise for women with rheumatoid arthritis? A qualitative study.
Disability and Rehabilitation - June 30, 2015

Purpose: This study qualitatively examined the attitudes and perceived barriers to exercise of women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We also explored the level of exercise that might be considered helpful or harmful, and whether walking would be an acceptable type of exercise. Method: Eight women with RA were interviewed via telephone using a semi-structured approach. Transcripts were coded for themes using the General Inductive Approach. These themes were used to develop a theoretical model of the effect of barriers and facilitators to exercise for women with RA. Results: Two themes emerged (social connections and fear). Social connections could facilitate participation in exercise or prove to be a barrier. Fear had three distinct sub-themes: fear of the unknown (including a safe level of exercise), fear of the known and fear for safety. For most participants, walking 3–4 times a week was thought to be an acceptable programme for themselves or others with RA. Conclusion: Among those interviewed, walking was considered an acceptable form of exercise for people with RA. Many of the barriers to exercise identified by participants could be alleviated by detailed instructions on the type and duration of exercise recommended. These can findings inform the development of walking interventions.

The 7 most common health myths busted
M2 Women Magazine - Jun 2015
In the article I delve into explaining how the seven myths are not quite the full picture due to the oversimplification of facts.
These myths include: low fat; paleo; no sugar; artificial sugar; no carb.

The Band-IT
M2 Women Magazine - Jun 2015
A fully illustrated and demonstrated workout using resistance bands.
The benefits and history of resistance bands are discussed.

Dichotomy in translation raises the need for careful definition in use
British Journal of Sports Medicine - February 23, 2015
Response to piece on "intensity" as a term in resistance training.
Clarification on the definition of use of the term 'intensity' as raised by Steele certainly serves to highlight the continuing variation - and confusion - around use of this term. Due to the ambiguity as to whether intensity is a measured load or is synonymous with perceived level of exertion, Steele recommended abandonment of intensity as a descriptive word.

The right medicine (ball)
M2 Women Magazine - Nov 2014
A fully illustrated (with demonstrative pictures) workout involving the use of a medicine ball with safety considerations and exercise descriptions. There is also a history of the use of medicine balls in training.

Rude Not to Stair
New Zealand Fitness Magazine - Jul 2014
A fully illustrated (with demonstrative pictures) workout involving stairs with safety considerations and exercise descriptions. A fully illustrated (with demonstrative pictures) workout involving the use of a medicine ball with safety considerations and exercise descriptions. There is also a history of the use of medicine balls in training.

Diets and Willpower
M2 Women Magazine - Mar 2014
This article investigates the physiological and psychological factors which are reducing your ability to reach your goals. Understanding why diets so often have an expiry date can help with how you might change your diet expectations for the better. Also find out how you might harness the power of your psyche to make your diet a success.

Can clean eating lead to bingeing
Fitness Life - Mar 2014
Restrictive dieting and the effect on eating patterns, psychological and behavioral implications

Ride the battleropes wave!
Fitness Life - Feb 2014
A fully illustrated (with demonstrative pictures) workout involving battleropes with safety considerations and exercise descriptions.

Under Suspense TRX training
Fitness Life - Sep 2013
A fully illustrated (with demonstrative pictures) workout involving TRX with safety considerations and exercise descriptions.

Fit for Good
New Zealand Fitness Magazine - Nov 2012
Becoming fit with the benefit of also raising money for charity

Power Bags: Bags of Benefits
Fitness Life
A fully illustrated (with demonstrative pictures) workout involving powerbags with safety considerations and exercise descriptions.Becoming fit with the benefit of also raising money for charity

drsuz@drsuzsquad.com

Highett, Victoria, Australia

©2020 by Dr Susan Baxter

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